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ENGL 101 - Hoover: Home

MLA citation help

Helpful Resources

How to Evaluate Internet Resources  http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/TeachingLib/Guides/Internet/Evaluate.html

research help http://libraryguides.binghamton.edu/content.php?pid=83371&sid=2972942

Formal vs. Informal Writing http://www2.ivcc.edu/rambo/tip_formal_writing_voice.htm

Oxford Dictionaries http://oxforddictionaries.com/

Quotes http://www.quoteland.com/ (large selection of quotes, many organized by abstract noun)

The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy http://plato.stanford.edu/

Cambridge Thesaurus of American English http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=nlebk&AN=42542&site=ehost-live

Documentaries http://www.freedocumentaries.org/ (free documentaries)

Documentaries http://video.pbs.org/ (lots of streaming documentaries on subjects you write about)

Fact Check http://www.politifact.com/ (fact check site)

Fact Check http://www.factcheck.org/ (fact check site)

Fact Check http://www.snopes.com/ (check truth of "urban myths")

Pronouns https://genderneutralpronoun.wordpress.com/tag/ze-and-zir/

Using Commas, Colons, or Words to Introduce Quotes (http://www2.ivcc.edu/rambo/eng1001/quotes.htm)

Evidence based research http://pewresearch.org/ (Numbers, facts and trends that shape your world)

(Big Think)  http://bigthink.com/


Movie Trailers

Enter the title of the movie in the search box in YouTube http://www.youtube.com/

Links to E-Reserves

Language and Learning

Left/Right Brain Thinking) http://psychology.about.com/od/cognitivepsychology/a/left-brain-right-brain.htm “Left Brain vs. Right Brain: Understanding the Myth and Reality of Left Brain and Right Brain Dominance” by Kendra Cherry

(Critical Thinking)  www.insightassessment.com/content/download/1176/.../what&why2010.pdf   “Critical Thinking: What it is and Why it counts 2011 Update” by Peter A. Facione

(The Human Brain and the Law) http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/print/2011/07/the-brain-on-trial/308520/ "The Brain on Trial" by David Eagleman

(Meeting the Bottom Line in the College Biz) http://ezproxy.olympic.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=4277102&site=ehost-live  “Meeting the Bottom Line in the College Biz” by Lynne Drury Lerych

(IQ) http://ezproxy.olympic.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=4582197&site=ehost-live  “IQ Intelligence: The Surprising Truth” by Stephen Ceci (Includes audio version)

(Politics and the English Language) http://orwell.ru/library/essays/politics/english/e_polit “Politics and the English Language” by George Orwell

(Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy) https://lizethtkt.wordpress.com/2011/05/27/bloom%E2%80%99s-taxonomy-and-its-two-updates/




Interior Profile


Meyers-Briggs: www.humanmetrics.com/cgi-win/JTypes1.htm

Project Implicit: (Three or more) https://implicit.harvard.edu/implicit/

Multiple Intelligences:  www.literacyworks.org/mi/assessment/findyourstrengths.html

Learning Styles:  Styles http://www.learning-styles-online.com/

Political Compass Test www.politicalcompass.org/

Political Typology—scroll down to “take the quiz” http://www.people-press.org/2011/05/04/beyond-red-vs-blue-the-political-typology/

Emotional “EQ” Test  http://queendom.com/tests/access_page/index.htm?idRegTest=1121

Learning Styles Generational Learning Styles Handout—Find your chapter based on your year of birth--Print and highlight main ideas and things that ring true.

Academic Disciplines—choose one specific area of study from each of the 5 main areas. Summarize each one: What is it? What do people “do” with it? What is it good for? For one of them, research careers and pay scales for people who have that degree. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_academic_disciplines


Prepare,  write, revise, and type your reflection:

Prepare--Take the “tests”/surveys. Print out the results page for each one.  No test should cost any money—if the site has changed, or a link is broken, please let me know. (For English 99 students, these results pages are due in class throughout the quarter.)

Write--Set a timer (20 minutes) and write a continuous informal reflection on the information you have gathered. Include the most surprising or intriguing information that was revealed by this process. Ask—and, if possible, answer—any questions that arise.

For instance…What personality trait most often gets you into trouble, and how can you use this as a strength in your life?

What about yourself would you change, if you could, and how?

How could you choose a course of study or career that would feature your favorite strengths?

What are your best qualities?

What do others respect about you?

What skills did you bring with you to college and what strengths have improved recently?

Revise--Comment on the information you have assembled and reflect on who you are as a person, student, citizen, etc. Create an emphasis that is meaningful to you. Include information about your intellectual opportunities in life, your level of intellectual engagement, and your intellectual intent. Focus on positives rather than negatives.

Type--Choose a format/presentation style that communicates effectively and efficiently (i.e. a mixture of labeled sections, paragraphs, bulleted lists, charts/graphs, poems, quotes, short essays, journal entries, comments of friends, visual illustrations, etc.). Let your (theoretical) audience see the picture of you that emerges. This project should be typed and easy to read.


Syllabus and Essential Course Handouts


Library Faculty

Dianne Carey
Olympic College
1600 Chester Ave
Bremerton, WA 98337