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Rubrics: Evaluate your rubrics

Ways to quantify the quality of your students' work, making grading more transparent to them.

You Wrote a Rubric, Now Evaluate it!

Once you've generated your rubrics for an assignment, a paper or for the entire course, you need to evaluate them. Two frequently used techniques are:

  • Ask a colleague to review and critique it;
  • Test it yourself with a hypothetical case;
  • Ask your students to review it giving you questions about unclear sections.  OR
  • Use the "Rubric for Rubric" in the box below.

"Rubric for Rubric"

RUBRIC FOR RUBRIC (Created by Marlene Biseda and Ariana Brooks)

CATEGORY

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Rubric Categories Uniqueness

Rubric has unique assessment categories.

Most of the assessment categories (>50%) are unique but a few overlap with others.

Some of the assessment categories (about 50%) are unique but some overlap with others.

Few of the assessment categories (<50%) are unique; most overlap with others.

Rubric categories are not unique and overlap each other.

Rubric Category Objectives

Assessment categories account for all tasks and subtask objective factors of the learning experience.

Assessment categories account for most of the relative factors of the learning experience.

Assessment categories account for some of the relative factors of the learning experience.

Few assessment categories account for the relative factors of the learning experience.

Assessment categories do not account for all relevant factors of the learning experience.

Rubric Category Assessment Criteria

Assessment criteria for each category are clearly defined.

Assessment criteria for most of the categories (>50%) are clearly defined.

Assessment criteria for some of the categories (about 50%) are clearly defined.

Assessment criteria for few of the categories (<50%) are clearly defined.

Assessment criteria are not clearly defined for any category.

Rubric Category Importance/ Weight

The relative importance/ weight of each category is identified.  

The relative importance /weight of most categories (>50%) is identified.

The relative importance/ weight of some categories (about 50%) is identified.

The relative importance/ weight of few categories (<50%) is identified.

The relative importance/ weight is not identified for any category.

Rubric Performance Scale

Rubric scale clearly defines all levels of performance.

Rubric scale clearly defines most levels of performance.

Rubric scale clearly defines some levels of performance.

Rubric scale clearly defines few levels of performance.

Rubric scale does not clearly define levels of performance.

Rubric Scale Differentiation

Achievement at each level is clearly differentiated from that of the higher and lower levels.

Achievement at most levels is clearly differentiated from that of the higher and lower levels.

Achievement at few levels is clearly differentiated from that of the higher and lower levels.

Achievement at few levels is clearly differentiated from that of the higher and lower levels.

Achievement at each level is  not clearly differentiated from that of the higher and lower levels.

Rubric Scale Tone

[Blank in original]

[Blank in original]

Scale labels and details are positive.

Most scale labels and details are positive.

Scale labels and details are negative.

Richlin, Laurie. Blueprint for Learning : constructing college courses to facilitate, assess, and document learning, 144.  Available from Teaching & Learning Collection, Haselwood Library, Basement,  378.199 Ri399b